I’ve got good news, and bad news

Okay, so the good news is that the scale needle is moving again, thank goodness:

Height: 5’7″
SW: 174
Last Week: 167
This week: 163
Change: -4
Total Loss: -11
And then the kinda-bad news…
I have had pain in my right hip for a couple of years. I have tried literally everything possible to treat this pain, from ice to massage to new mattresses to anti-inflammatories. One doctor diagnosed me with arthritis, but my pain management doc wasn’t convinced. Finally, I had an MRI done a couple of weeks ago.
I have a torn gluteus medius muscle, and the severity of this tear is yet to be determined. I am to try physical therapy for 4-6, but if that doesn’t make a difference, I will need surgery. this means no running for 12 weeks (at a minimum – that’sjust an estimate).
double_facepalm
So the workouts are going to be run-free for quite a little bit. I’m looking at hiking, yoga and swimming. I’m much calmer about this than I was last week (my weigh-in post got lost in the tantrum last week). So we’ll see how it goes.
Never a dull moment around here!
Help someone else fitness in:
Share

Weigh-In Wednesday (grrrr)

Exactly

OK, so happy Wednesday, everyone! Well, kinda happy. I am running, I am eating better, and this week we have another stall:

Height: 5’7″
SW: 174
Last Week: 167
This week: 167
Change: 0
Total Loss: -7
So, as I do for many other issues in life, I Googled it. I came across an interesting article at Outside magazine on not eating enough while working out, and how your body can prevent you from losing weight to protect you from starving… interesting….
Help someone else fitness in:
Share

Wednesday Weigh In, and I’m Back

goodnewsbadnewsThis week, I have good news and not-so-good news….

The good news

Last Saturday I ran my first 5K since my eye surgery! It was not at all my best time – not even close – but I still loved the experience and was so grateful for being able to run again, to have my vision still (most of it), and to still have the desire to get out there! I am running one again this Saturday and will surely beat last week’s time…

The not-so-good news

My Wednesday Weigh In yesterday is nothing spectacular – I am actually up a pound, and I’m not sure what that’s about. I’m not too stressed about it though – if I still don’t see any decrease next week I’ll reconsider what I’m doing and see where I can fine tune my eating/working out.

Help someone else fitness in:
Share

3 Ways to Become Mentally Tougher

ursomuchstrongerSince I’m returning to running after recovering from my (second) eye surgery, I’m readying myself for the race season. I’m very excited because entering races means I’ve gotten back into shape after the long period of bedrest/head-down recovery.

This season, I’m doing a lot of research into the mental aspect of competing or what many people refer to as ‘sports psychology’. I think endurance sports are rife for results based on what our brains are telling us. Attitude certainly must give us an edge, if it’s the right attitude.

It’s a huge subject, and I’ve only scratched the surface with my research, but here are some things I’ve learned so far:

1) Don’t operate on fear. Fear of failure prevents me from doing my best at anything. Thoughts that are based in fear will psyche me out. Instead, focus on desire or what you want to happen. For example, instead of thinking to yourself, “Don’t come in last – don’t make a fool of yourself!”, replace this though with “Start strong, but finish stronger!”

2) Keep thoughts positive. Any negative thinking has the potential to affect my physical feeling. When a negative thought comes into my head, I need to quickly ‘reframe’ it (popular psychology term) or think it with a positive spin. For example, instead of saying to myself that I am going to slowly, I can say to myself ‘I have the energy for a strong finish’.

3) Beware comparison. When I compare myself to slower runners, I may feel better for a moment, but there are more runners that are faster than me then those that are slower, so comparison is the ‘junk food’ of motivation. Instead of thinking that I will never be as fast as the woman who medaled during a specific race last year, I can instead observe her performance and say to myself, ‘I can medal as well, with the right amount of effort.’

Help someone else fitness in:
Share

Wednesday Weigh In – Yay!

I am out of the stall, ya’ll!

 

Height: 5’7″
SW: 174
Last Week: 167
This week: 166
Change: -1
Total Loss: -8

And I am so excited – I am running my first 5K since my eye surgery this Saturday! It has been work to get back in shape after being laid up for so long. I will try to take pictures!

Help someone else fitness in:
Share

3 Apps to Plan Safe Bike Routes

I live in a small Texas town, so bike commuting to do errands is a very tempting way to workout and hone the ‘to-do’ list at the same time. However, I really don’t want to ride on our 6-lane road through town – I’d like to take the quiet back streets. Being a car driver I’m not that familiar with the back streets though – where do I start?

Ah, technology to the rescue – there’s an app for that! Here’s a few apps to get you on a safe fitness route:

1) Bike Maps (IOS, Android, Windows Phone). Search by keyword or address for destinations to plan biking routes. $1.99

2) New Route (IOS, Android, Windows Phone). Lets you plan routes for cycling, walking, running, or driving. You can plan your route via search or by tapping start points and end points on the map. The app will also tell you distance covered by your route. Free

3) Route Planner (IOS, Android, Windows Phone). This app accounts for changes in elevation when planning your run, bike ride or car trip. It also allows you to plan for intermediate stops and to send your routes to your contacts. 0.99

Help someone else fitness in:
Share

The beginner’s guide to bike racks

Um, no.

Um, no.

In order to take your bike with you on your trip around town or around the country, you need a bike rack for your vehicle. There are 3 main types of vehicle bike rack, and understanding the uses and beneifts of each type will help you make a worthwhile purchase. Here’s the skinny on each type of vehicle bike rack:

 

1) Hitch-mounted. As the name suggests, this type is attached to your trailer hitch. Hitch-mounted racks are the most popular option because you won’t have to lift your bike over your head, and you won’t experience the wind drag of having the bike on the roof of your car. The rack itself doesn’t adhere to the body of your car, so your paint job will stay intact, too. These can be difficult to install, however, so shop at a place that offers to install it for you. The disadvantages of a hitch-mounted rack are decreased visibility behind the driver and the possibility of bike damage during a rear-end impact.

 

2) Roof-mounted. If your vehicle has roof rails, a roof-mounted rack is also an option, though these work best with lower cars. This is the preferred rack for those who want to minimize the risk of accident-related bicycle damage as much as possible. A roof-mounted rack also gives the driver unobstructed sight while driving. The disadvantages are that you’ll have to get your bike(s) onto the roof of the car (if you’re considering a roof-mounted rack, try lifting your bike above your head to make sure this is a realistic idea), and you’ll experience drag while driving. Also, be sure to put a post-it note somewhere on your dash reminding yourself that your bike is on the roof before you pull into the garage.

 

3)Trunk-mounted. If you only need to transport your bike occasionally, this is a good entry-level option. Trunk-mounted racks attach to the back of your vehicle and hold the bike against your door of your trunk. These are by far the least expensive option, and typically easy to load. However, installation quality is the key to success with a trunk-mounted rack, so make sure you have done a quality setup. Also, trunk-mounted racks do not typically lock, so you should plan to not leave the vehicle unattended when the bikes are loaded. Similar to the hitch-mounted rack, driver visibility will be decreased in the rear, and there is a chance of bicycle damage in the event of a rear-impact collision.

Help someone else fitness in:
Share

Working out with a cold – my research

You get a coldSomewhere in the past few days, I received, as one of the kids I used to babysit used to call it, the booger touch. Civilians refer to this as a ‘cold’: body aches, too much snot, etc. Now that the sun is out down here, the question I pose to myself is should I run if I have a cold?

Naturally, I Googled it. Here’s  the major results I found…

Web MD – moderate workout is fine, as long as you don’t have asthma (which I don’t)

Fox News Health – not with symptoms below the neck, like body aches (which I do)

MayoClinic – Not with symptoms below the neck (seeing a pattern here)

Womenshealthmag.com – Not with symptoms below the neck.

So it looks like I will have to wait until the body aches are gone….

Help someone else fitness in:
Share